A view from INTECOL and beyond.

This year I have been privileged to gain a place on the BES undergraduate fellowship and this allowed me to attend  the annual meeting which was held, in conjunction with INTECOL,  at the ExCel in London. It was particularly poignant since this is the centenary year

UFS 13/14 at INTECOL

UFS 13/14 at INTECOL

Things started a few days before conference with access to the useful online app which allowed remote viewing of the whole conference programme. The UFS met with Fran Sconce on Sunday afternoon and made our way to Docklands and the ExCel, a venue so large that it has 2 DLR stations. For us the afternoon was taken up with pre-registration workshops run by Karen Devine and the ever helpful Tom Ezzard  and his colleagues from the International Network of Next Generation Ecologists (INNGE). Meanwhile others attended parallel sessions on forest ecology and eco trips in and around London. This was all followed by a mixer which gave an opportunity to meet up with old colleagues or to be introduced to new people.

I don’t intend to talk about the specifics of the science here, there was too much for one thing and I need time to digest it all, so perhaps I will talk about some of that in forthcoming posts. So how did I find the conference? Firstly it was bigger than I could ever have imagined, I mean really big! It wasn’t the first scientific conference that I had attended but it was the first with multiple parallel sessions and it was difficult to decide where to go next at times. Some of the talks left me reeling and wondering if other delegates were similarly lost, I am a junior ecologist and some of the topics were very narrow and completely new to me. Having said that it was really friendly and people were easy to talk to.

I liked the way that the days were structured with two plenaries interspersed with symposia, workshops and poster sessions. Having the plenary up first gave an extra incentive to arrive punctually and usually got the mind working with something insightful or thought provoking. I thought the choice of plenary speakers was interesting especially on the final day with Martin Nowak presenting some, perhaps controversial, thoughts from his 2010 paper “The Evolution of Eusociality” in the morning and Tim Clutton Brock coming at the same topics from a different angle in the afternoon, this was an invigorating way to end the week and I remember thinking at the time that it was a shame that a number of delegates had obviously left early and so missed it.  Besides the plenary speakers I saw some truly inspiring speakers amongst whom Corey Bradshaw  and Barbara J Anderson  stood out as excellent communicators. However my top marks for presentation must go to Alexandra Sutton who, when beset with technical gremlins, presented her PHD research from memory with no AV support at all! There really was a lesson for early career scientists about the importance of honing presentation skills and this was driven home when Joel Cohen  spoke so engagingly  for 45 minutes about Taylor’s law. With this in mind I have booked a place on the mastering ecology symposium where I hope to get practice presenting my own research.

A further highlight was the way that twitter was used at the conference (#INT13) with plenary questions taken on the hashtag and many people (myself included) live tweeting from the parallel sessions. One downside here though was the lack of available charging points for hand held devices in the symposium rooms. Kathryn Luckett (@DExtER_Exp) used twitter to great effect to highlight the disparity between the numbers of male and female speakers at the conference , this was particularly noticeable during the panel debate where all 4 speakers were senior male scientists (Granted that one female was invited but dropped out through illness). Live tweeting turned out to be a real challenge; firstly a junior scientist needs to pluck up the courage to put their interpretation of the talk out there, then you need to get around the fact that you always thought it was rude to be using a mobile device while somebody was talking to you and finally you need to be able to do 3 things at once (listen, interpret and communicate). However once I got the hang of it I did find that tweeting helped me to engage more with the science and I was genuinely excited to see some of my tweets re tweeted!

I found the week to be thought provoking and inspiring in equal measure and the social events each evening were often second to none, particularly the final bash to celebrate 100 years of the BES on which the committee deserve hearty congratulations .  On a personal note I was also pleased to see Libby John, who has made a real difference at Lincoln University and who encouraged me to join the BES, receive an award for her service as erstwhile chair of the education committee.

I owe the BES a genuine debt of gratitude for a very memorable week, THANK YOU!

Next year’s meeting is in Lille, hope to see you there!

It is probably worth repeating here that the BES offers a years free membership if you join as a student.

Advertisements

One thought on “A view from INTECOL and beyond.

  1. Pingback: Trends in ecological research from the 2013 INTECOL Conference | rickylawton

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s